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Pride Flags Colors explained!

Fri Jun 21, 2013, 12:28 AM


I'll try to list as many pride colors as I can think of.

Pride Stamp by xxstamps Gay Pride (Rainbow - Gay, Gay Men, Lesbians, and sometimes the entire Queer community.  The rainbow represents acceptance of all sexual orientations.)
Labrys Lesbian Pride (Purple with Labrys in inverted black triangle [different versions exist] - Lesbians, women, and feminism, and gynephilic people who identify as female. Labrys became a symbol of lesbians and feminists due to the popularity of a female empowerment publication called Labrys Magazine.  In addition, the black triangle is a symbol of lesbians due to the fact that many lesbians were forced to wear it in concentration camps during the Holocaust under the idea that they were "asocial" and did not conform to heteronormativity).
DA Stamp - Bisexuality 01 by tppgraphics Bisexual Pride (Pink, Purple, and Blue - Bisexuals and sometimes all multisexual/non-monosexual/multiple gender attracted people.)
Pansexual Pride by andshedreamed Pansexual Pride (Pink, yellow, blue - Pansexual.  The pink and blue represent the gender binary of male and female attraction while yellow represents attraction beyond the binary.  Yellow was also chosen because it represents life and happiness.  The color yellow is also rarely used in pride flags, with the exception of those that include rainbows.  The pansexual flag was based on the pink, purple, and blue bisexual flag, but the yellow stripe gives the pansexual flag its own unique identity.)
Polysexual Pride (Pink, green, and blue - Polysexual. Based on bisexual colors..  Pink represents attraction to females.  Blue represents attraction to males.  Green most likely represents attraction to people with non-binary gender identities.)
Transgender and Transsexualism by andshedreamed Transgender and Transsexual Pride (Light blue stripe, pink stripe, white stripe, pink stripe, blue stripe - Transgender people and transsexuals.  Also sometimes for all genderqueer, intersex, drag, and all gender non-conforming identified people.  Although, it is important to note that genderqueer and intersex people have their own respective flags as well.  This flag was created by a trans woman named Monica Helms who says: "The stripes at the top and bottom are light blue, the traditional color for baby boys. The stripes next to them are pink, the traditional color for baby girls. The stripe in the middle is white, for those who are intersex, transitioning or consider themselves having a neutral or undefined gender. The pattern is such that no matter which way you fly it, it is always correct, signifying us finding correctness in our lives.")
Two-Spirit (Rainbow flag with a Native American symbol in the middle - Two-Spirit identified people. The rainbow represents the LGBT spectrum, and the Native American symbol represents the cultural origin of Two Spirit.)
Genderqueer Stamp by sunbirds Genderqueer Pride (Lavender, white, and dark green - Genderqueer Pride.  Lavender is a mixture of blue and pink and represents genderqueer people who identify as both male and female.  The white stripe represents genderqueer people who fall outside of the female-male binary.  Dark green represents the inverse of lavender for those who do not identify as female nor male).
Feather Pride Flag (A gold phoenix in front of red triangles and a black and white triangle pattern - Drag pride, drag queen pride, drag king pride, pride for those attracted to people in drag, and other fetishes. The phoenix is a symbol of rebirth while the red triangles represent the passion that the drag community had during the early days of the AIDS epidemic. NOTE: The Feather Pride flag has nothing to do with fetishes concerning feathers or birds.  The name comes strictly from the phoenix symbol and only represents the drag community, people attracted to people in drag, and similar sexual orientations and gender identities.)
Androgynous Pride (Gray flag with an equal sign in which the top part is blue and the bottom is pink - Androgyny. The gray part of the flag represents the gray area between genders.  The equal sign represents the equality between men and women.)
Intersex Pride by andshedreamed Bigender Pride (Lavender, white, light blue, pink, white, lavender - Bigendered people.  The outer lavender stripes represent different mixtures of female and male characteristics, and the blue and pink stripes represent the presence of male and female mixed identities, and the white stands for sexuality and transitioning. NOTE: Early I had said that it is the Intersex and Bigender flag, but it is actually only representativ of Bigenderness.  Intersexuality has sometimes been incorrectly and inappropriately attached to other flags even though there is an official Intersex flag).
Intersex Pride by RadicalRadio Intersex Pride (Purple circle against a yellow background - Intersexuality.  Yellow represents neutrality in gender instead of associating masculinity with blue and femininity with pink.  It is also the main color of the Hermaphrodite Flag. The circle symbolizes wholeness).
Trigender Pride (Pink stripe, blue stripe, green stripe, blue stripe, and pink stripe - Trigender and possibly Third Gender. This is not an official flag but is a proposed or potential flag.  The meaning of the colors are unknown, though it is very likely that pink represents the female aspect of gender, blue for male, and green for third or other gender.)
Hermaphrodite Flag (Stripes in shades of orange, yellow, and green with purple Venus' hand mirror / female symbol and Mars' shield / male symbol joined together in the center - Hermaphrodite Pride. Yellow represents neutrality in gender instead of associating masculinity with blue and femininity with pink.  The flag is based on the Gay Pride flag in the sense of having a spectrum of hues that represent a fluid spectrum of gender.  Venus and Mars symbols represent the unity of female and male characteristics and genitalia, with purple symbolizing the mixture of pink and blue as feminine and male colors.  NOTE: Hermaphrodite should not be confused with intersex.  The word "intersex" is an umbrella term for people born with androgynous or ambiguous genitalia.  Hermaphrodites are a specific type of intersexuality in which a person has both sets of female and male genitalia.  Hermaphrodites are considered part of the intersex spectrum; ironically, "hermaphrodite" used to be the accepted term for all intersexuality until intersex activists intervened.)
Genderfluid Pride (Pink, white, purple, black, blue - Genderfluid. Pink represents femininity.  White represents all genders.  Purple represents masculinity and femininity.  Black represents genderlessness.  Blue stands for masculinity.)
Non-Binary Pride (Black, white, orange, and yellow - For those who identify outside the male-female gender identity binary. This may or may not be the "official" flag, and other variations exist.  The exact meaning of each color of the flag is unknown.  The following meanings are just my guesses based on the color interpretations of other pride flags, so they may or ma not be accurate.  The black stripe might represent agender, third-gender, or genderlessness.  White may stand for equality or neutral/unidentified/questioning gender or sexuality.  Orange may stand for lithromantics, which are people who may have romantic feelings towards others but either do not want their love to be reciprocated or do not require romantic love to be a part of relationships.  Yellow may represent happiness or being outside the gender binary.)
Polyamory Pride Flag - (Blue, red, and black with a gold lowercase pi from the Greek alphabet. Polyamory.  Blue represents openness and honesty between all lovers involved in each relationship.  Red represents love and passion.  Black represents all people in open and consensual relationships who have to hide their relationships due to social discrimination.  The golden pi represents the value placed on emotional attachments to others.)
Asexuality by flying-wolf-32 Asexual Pride (Black stripe, grey stripe, white stripe, and purple stripe - Asexual, demisexual, and sometimes aromantic.  The black stripe represents asexuality.  The gray stripe represents grey area between sexual and asexual feelings.  The white stripe represents sexuality.  The purple stripe represents community.)
Demisexual Pride (A thick white stripe, thin purple stripe, and a thick gray stripe with a black triangle on the dominating the left side - Demisexuals.  Again, the meaning of the colors is unknown, though it appears to be based on the Asexual Pride Flag.  The thick white stripe might symbolize sexuality, agender, intersexuality, transitioning, genderlessness, or being outside the straight-gay and male-female binaries.  The thin purple stripe might represent female and male relationships, and the gray stripe might stand for asexuality. Black triangle might stand for romantics who reject traditional romance, asexuality, agender or genderlessness.)
Autochorissexual Pride (A triangle pointing toward with horizontal stripes in the colors purple, white, grey, and black juxtaposed to two smaller triangles with horizontal stripes in the colors black, grey, white, and purple - Autochorissexuality.  [Anthony Bogaert created the term and says that it is a sub-section of asexuality.  It represents people who do not want to have sex with another person nor experience sexual attraction to others but still are aroused by observing sexual content that may include pornography, sexual fantasies, erotica, etc.]  Hunterinabrowncoat created the flag.  Purple, white, grey, and black are the colors of the asexual flag.  The black stripe represents asexuality.  The gray stripe represents grey area between sexual and asexual feelings.  The white stripe represents sexuality.  The purple stripe represents community.  The inverted triangle represents the idea that autochorissexuals have an inverted perspective on sexuality; Hunterinabrowncoat says that asexuals are not attracted to others though some asexuals engage or desire to engage in sexual activities while autochorissexuals have sexual attraction but do not want to engage in sexual activities).
(Horizontal stripes [in order of top to bottom]: purple, grey, white, grey, and purple - Created by Shikku27316 as a proposed flag.  "My original explanation was kinda dumb. The purple was asexuality, the white was allosexuality, and the grey was the region of "getting over" asexuality, and then "getting over" allosexuality to be asexual again, but that sounds pretty dumb, plus it's not the only definition of greysexual. So, the colours mean the same, but it's kinda symbolising the two coming together to make the grey area." - Shikku27316  [Of course, I don't think it was dumb. :)  If you get the chance, say something nice about it to Shikku] )
Aromantic Pride (Green, yellow, orange, and black - Aromantic and lithromantic. According to the creators of the flag: "We designed the flag to be as inclusive as possible and we used fairly basic color symbolism. Green, (being the opposite, complimentary color to red, which usually represents romance), represents aromanticism. Yellow, like the yellow rose which represents friendship, stands for various forms of queerplatonic love. Orange, being red once removed toward yellow, represents lithromantics. And black represents romantics who choose to reject traditional romance.")
Neutrois Pride (White, green, and black - Neutrois [genderless, agender, neutral gender, etc.]. The white stripe stands for neutral, unidentified, or questioning gender.  The green stripe represents non-binary gender.  The black stripe represents agender, asexuality, or third-gender.)
Leather Pride Flag. by Ambelleina Leather Pride - (Black stripe, blue stripe, black stripe, blue stripe, white stripe, blue stripe, black stripe, blue stripe, black stripe, and a red heart in the upper left corner - Leather subculture.  Black and blue stripes represent "being black and blue," which sometimes occurs after a leather encounter.  The vast majority of people in the leather subculture emphasize consent and safety during leather sexual activity.)
BDSM Pride (Black stripe, blue stripe, black stripe, blue stripe, white stripe, blue stripe, black stripe, blue stripe, black stripe, and the Quagmyr's BDSM emblem in red and white in the middle - BDSM subculture [Bondage and Discipline, Sadomasochism, and Domination and Submission]. Based on the Leather flag combined with Quagmyr's BDSM emblem.)
Lipstick Lesbian Pride - (Stripes of different shades of red, purple, and pink with a white stripe in the middle as well as a lipstick print in the upper left corner. - Lipstick / Femme / Feminine Lesbians and other feminine female identified people who are attracted to female identified people.  The shades of red, purple, and pink represents traditionally female associated colors.)
Boi Pride ([from right to left, top to bottom, diagonal stripes at a 45 degree angle] Green stripe, black stripe, green stripe, black stripe, white stripe, black stripe, green stripe, black stripe, green stripe, and a red heart in the upper right corner - Boi or boy, with boi sometimes associated with butch lesbian or young gay man. Based on the Leather pride flag, the diagonal tilt represents the elevated status of the Sir over the submissive status of the boi or boy.  The red heart is in the right corner to symbolize where a boi/boy's heart is, and the green color represents a boyish color, possibly denoting the "green" or inexperienced young man.)
The International Bear Brotherhood Pride Flag (Brown, orange, yellow, light beige, white, grey, and black with a bear paw print in black in the upper left corner - Bears [hairy gay men]. The colors represent the various skin tones and natural hair colors as a sign of equality and unity.  In addition, hair color has a connection to the body hair of self-identified bears.)
Furry Pride (Canine) (A plain white flag with a gray dog pawprint in the middle - Furry pride specifically for dog/canine focused furries, but it can sometimes represent all furries, Anthro, Morph, and Yiffies in the community. This is one of many flags that represent the Furry community, and there doesn't seem to be a consensus on which is the "official" or widely accepted flag.  The dog pawprint represents the canine type fandom and also can also represent furries in general.  It is unknown what the colors of the flag represent.)
Furry Pride (Feline) (Light blue, pink, and light purple with a white cat pawprint in the middle - Furry pride specifically for cat/feline/kitten furries, but it can also sometimes represent all furries, Anthro, Morph, and Yiffies. The light blue represents males, pink represents females, and light purple represents transgender individuals.  The white cat paw print represents felines and also equality for furries of all genders.)
Androphilia Pride (Black, gray, white, and green - Androphilia in people of all gender identities.  The meaning of each color in the flag is unknown for certain, but it is possible to make an educated guess based on other pride flags.  Black could stand for gender neutrality or rejection of the straight-gay binary and the female-male binary.  Gray might stand for the gray area between genders, reflecting that many gender non-conforming people identify as androphilic.  White may represent equality, intersexuality, transitioning or neutral gender, or the idea that attraction to males does not equate to femininity.  Green might symbolize masculinity or attraction to males.)
Gynephilia Pride (Black, gray, white, and pink - Gynephilia in people of all gender identities.  The flag is not an official flag, just a proposed one.  It appears to be based on the Androphilia Pride Flag.  It is uncertain what each color stands for, but based on the Androphilia Pride Flag and other flags, this is my educated guess.  Black could stand for gender neutrality or rejection of the straight-gay binary and the female-male binary.  Gray might stand for the gray area between genders, reflecting that many gender non-conforming people identify as gynephilic.  White may represent equality, intersexuality, transitioning or neutral gender, or the idea that attraction to females does not necessarily a result of masculinity or femininity.  And pink is probably a tribute to attraction to all female identified people.)
Victory Over AIDS flag - (Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, and black stripes.  Clearly based on the Gay Pride rainbow flag.  Although it is based on the Gay Pride flag, it most likely does not only represent AIDS in the male gay community.  A person of any sexual orientation and gender identity can contract HIV or AIDS.  The extra black stripe probably represents death, but it is possible that it represents triumph over darkness).
Marriage Equality by blackdahlia Marriage Equality (A red background with a pink equals sign - For all those who support the right of people to marry whomever they choose, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.  It is usually representative of the battle for same-sex marriage in the United States but can also represent equal marital rights internationally.  The flag was originally a blue background with a yellow equals sign.  It was created by the Human Rights Campaign, an organization that fights for LGBT rights.  It became increasingly popular at the same time that the demand for equal marital rights sparked the nation, so the organization changed it to red and pink to represent love, passion, equality, and the queer community.)
Straight Ally For LGBTQ Rights by LeiAndLove Ally Pride (Inverted V-shaped Rainbow triangle against black and white stripes - Allies, who usually identify as straight and cisgender, supporting the LGBT community, though it can also include people of all sexual orientations and gender identities.  The inverted rainbow V represents the A in Activism while the black stripes represent heterosexuality.)
Metrosexual Pride (Light gray stripe, dark gray stripe, black stripe, purple stripe, black stripe, dark gray stripe, light gray stripe with a picture of a metrosexual man in the upper left corner [the man might be Mark Thaler, creator of the flag] - Metrosexual. It is unclear what each color means. The creator Mark Thaler sells memorabilia with this flag on it.)
Heterosexuality by flying-wolf-32 Heterosexual Pride (Black and white stripes - Heterosexual, usually cisgender, people.  The black and white stripes represent attraction to the opposite sex.  This is a very controversial flag because unlike the Ally Pride flag, which represents straight people and others who specifically support the LGBT community, the heterosexual flag is not necessarily an ally flag.  Some heterosexual-identified people use the flag as a homophobic reaction to LGBT pride.  Others may use the flag as an indicator of their sexual orientation, but even that motivation is very questionable to the idea of equality in the face of privilege.)

Add a Comment:
 
:iconsakkysa:
sakkysa Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you for compiling this!
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Student Writer
You're welcome! :D
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:icongingerbreadeffects:
gingerbreadeffects Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
That's not the bigender flag.  That is the intersex flag.
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2015  Student Writer
No, it is the bigender flag.  Somebody was angry at me for saying that flag was also the intersex flag.

commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Sex…
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:iconshikku27316:
Shikku27316 Featured By Owner Edited Mar 14, 2015
Not that you have to add it, but I made a grey-A/greysexual (it's two words for the same thing) flag a few years ago; I never intended for the flag to get used, but it is now, so here it is: pseudofauxfalsefake.files.word…
(The blog isn't mine; the original place I put flag got deleted, but it was salvaged before then.)
Edit: forgot the explanation!
My original explanation was kinda dumb. The purple was asexuality, the white was allosexuality, and the grey was the region of "getting over" asexuality, and then "getting over" allosexuality to be asexual again, but that sounds pretty dumb, plus it's not the only definition of greysexual. So, the colours mean the same, but it's kinda symbolising the two coming together to make the grey area.
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2015  Student Writer
I think it's a great flag, and I will add if you give me permission. :)
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:iconshikku27316:
Shikku27316 Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2015
Go ahead, seeing as people are already using it, I'm okay with it. Once people start to use it, that becomes the community flag.

By the way, would you happen to know where the androgynous flag was first proposed? I think it has some problems and I made a new one, but I won't be putting that on the Internet until it's finalised.
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:iconmelanie-sama:
Melanie-sama Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2015  Student Artist
Thank you for making this, it's very useful. :) I'm planning to make an art series of my OC's with their sexualities and their romantic attraction, and I was thinking they'd wear a pride flag of their respective sexualities on their clothes. Not sure how I'm going to visually represent their romantic attraction, though. ^^;
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2015  Student Writer
Cool!

One good way to do that would be to include it in the title of your deviations.  Or you could put them with someone they might be attracted to.  For example, if you are trying to represent a lesbian, you can have her wear purple and hold hands with another girl.  You could also use other symbols like the male symbol (Mars's shield), the female symbol (Venus's mirror), hearts to represent romantic orientation, and perhaps another symbol to represent sexual orientation.
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:iconmelanie-sama:
Melanie-sama Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2015  Student Artist
I think I'll stick with hearts. :) Also, thanks for the watch and the fav! >w< I really appreciate the support.
Reply
:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Student Writer
You're very welcome! :D
Reply
:iconfantasyfanrocks1:
fantasyfanrocks1 Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2015  Student Traditional Artist
Thank you for making this, I found ot very interesting and useful.
Reply
:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2015  Student Writer
You are very welcome!  Thank you for reading it!  I had fun making it!
Reply
:iconflower123wf:
Flower123wf Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2014
There's also autochorissexual.

I found info on it at hunterinabrowncoat.tumblr.com/… and it also includes the flag.
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2014  Student Writer
Thank you so much!!! :glomp:  I've added it to the list, and I will remember it in my mind.  I had never heard of it before, and I can understand why a lot of people would feel that way and identify that way.  Sometimes thinking about it is better than actually going through with it.
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:iconexperimentingaccount:
Bless you for making this! So handy!
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2014  Student Writer
Thank you! :hug:  I'll try to work on it even more!
Reply
:iconangel-of-the-doctor:
Angel-of-the-doctor Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2014  Student General Artist
Thanks for making this. I didn't know about a lot of these flags, and I wanted to make sure what the design difference was between the demi and ace flags. ^^
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2014  Student Writer
You're very welcome!  I should probably keep updating these flags. :)
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:icondirector-tiedemann:
Director-Tiedemann Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2014  Student Digital Artist
Boy do I have a LOT of cars to make!!!!
Reply
:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2014  Student Writer
Yes, it's sort of an unending list. . . .
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:icondirector-tiedemann:
Director-Tiedemann Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2014  Student Digital Artist
Well thanks for the watch, fave and llama!!!!
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2014  Student Writer
You are very welcome! :hug:
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:icongaaraofsuburbia:
GaaraOfSuburbia Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I'm fairly certain you've confused pan and polysexuality. Like polyamory, wouldn't polysexuality just mean having multiple sexual partners or relationships at once?
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2014  Student Writer
I'm completely certain that I have not.  I am pansexual.  I am panromantic.

A pansexual person is attracted to others without any regard to gender or gender identity.  It is also called genderblind or omnisexual.  I am open to dating people who are cisgender, transgender, intersex, genderqueer, trigender, bigender, third gender, genderless, neutrois, Two Spirit, or any other gender.  I don't care about gender whatsoever.  But that doesn't mean I'm some kind of promiscuous hypersexual person who will jump into bed with anyone I see.  Bisexuals and pansexuals often get that stereotype.  People ask all sorts of ignorant questions such as if I would be willing to go to a strip club with straight cis men, whether I have been in three-ways, whether I'm a swinger, etc.  Those questions were mainly for when I identified as bisexual, but people have no idea what pansexual means, so sometimes they think I'm some kind of hypersexual pervert.  Pansexuality has NOTHING to do with having many sexual partners or even having any at all.  Although I research a lot about multisexuality and LGBT issues, I don't really know that much about kinky sex.  I've only had one sexual partner in my entire life, and we dated for almost 4 years and almost got married.  We never did anything weird.  Because I research sexual orientation and such online and go to LGBT organizations, people come to me for sex advice when I'm actually not very knowledgeable about it or experienced.

Someone who is panromantic is romantically attracted to others without any regard to gender or gender identity.  It's different from pansexuality because it only concerns romantic attracted and not sexual attraction at all.  Pansexual tends to imply both.  It's kind of like how the word "homosexual" usually means someone is both romantically and sexually attracted to the same person.  The word panromantic was probably created to describe asexual people who have no sexual desire but are romantically attracted to people without any care to gender identity.

Polysexuality is NOT the same as polyamory.  Polyamory is a type consensual dating where three or more people agree to be part of the same relationship.  This doesn't mean that all members of the relationship are involved with each other.  For example, two men might be in a relationship with the same woman, but that doesn't mean that the men themselves are attracted to each other.  Polyamory has nothing to do with sexual orientation because you can be straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, demisexual, asexual, and pretty much any other sexual orientation, and it won't make a difference.

Polysexuality is when a person is attracted to more than gender or gender identity.  Unlike me, a pansexual, polysexuals are not necessarily attracted to all genders, just more than one.  Some people might be attracted to cisgender women and intersex people but not cisgender men or transgender women.  That's one example.  As you can see, it has nothing to do with the act of sex itself but sexual orientation.
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:iconzkitster:
zkitster Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2014
Here, this post en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGBT_sym… of LGBT symbology from wikipedia has refrences which your link to a list did not. It also look´s like this has replaced the link you used a reference as that post is no longer searchable on wikipedia. :)
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2014  Student Writer
Thank you.  I've added it. :)
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:iconzkitster:
zkitster Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2014
Most (ok every single one I know) Intersex people consider this to be the actual intersex pride flag: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I... and most find the "intersex" pride flag pictured here to be fairly offensive and derivative of this whole has to be a boy or girl thing which has lead doctors to frantically grab their scalpels to chop off offending parts. Those who dont find it offensive just really don´t care about it but definitley do not accept it as an Intersex Pride flag.
Also it is more commonly used to dictate bi gender status and intersex people are not bi gender, they are intersex which is not a gender identity. We have gender identities, we are not gender identities ;)
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2014  Student Writer
Well, I have to admit that I have not seen that flag before.  I just looked through a Google image search for "Intersex flag," and the majority of the flags included were the lavender, blue, and white one (not to be confused with the transgender one).  I did see the flag that you mentioned just now, but I'm surprised that it is considered the "actual" intersex pride flag because the yellow color is described as representing the idea of "hermaphrodite," which is archaic, offensive, or controversial depending who you talk to.

Also, I looked at the date that the flag was made.  It was in late 2013.  I am fairly certain I posted this before 2013, so it would not have been possible for me to know this at the time.  I try to keep an update on flags, but there are probably hundreds of versions of LGBT flags out there.  Sometimes I would find five or six different proposal versions for the same sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.  I tended to choose the one that was most popular or common.

In addition, I do know what bigender and intersex and recognize them as two very different and separate things.  When you read the following (assuming you haven't read this before because I understand it is very possible that you have), you'll see that this was a valid (though imperfect) flag.  For some reason, someone decided to smoosh two very different identities into one flag.

This what I found from the person who I think is the creator of the intersex flag version you mentioned (I apologize if I'm wrong about that):


"We struggle a bit with symbols for intersex; many of us don’t see the need for them, while other people seem to like something to identify with.

There is no commonly understood symbol or flag, even within intersex communities. Many attempts have seemed derivative, of a rainbow flag, of gendered pink and blue colours, of transgender symbols, or an infinity symbol used by some bisexual groups. This is one attempt to create something that is not derivative, but yet is firmly grounded in meaning.

The colour yellow has long been regarded as the hermaphrodite colour, neither blue nor pink – take a look at the trailer for Intersexion: www.youtube.com/watch?feature=…

Purple, too, has been used for the same purpose – including on this site.

The circle is unbroken and unornamented, symbolising wholeness and completeness, and our potentialities. We are still fighting for bodily autonomy and genital integrity, and this symbolises the right to be who and how we want to be.

We’ve received some positive feedback from diverse intersex communities. This is available freely for use by any intersex person or organisation who wishes to use it, in a human rights affirming community context."



This is what I plan to do. . . .

I'm going to keep the Bigender and Intersex flag up, but I will put a note about what this person said and the fact that a lot of people disagree with it.  I feel like people should know about the existence of flags that are controversial and be aware that not everyone agrees on them.  That way, they will also know as much as possible about the culture of flags and symbols.  I am also going to add the flag you showed me to the list as the Intersex flag and try to emphasize that the one you showed me.

Thank you for bringing this to my attention, but please don't assume I know nothing about what I am talking about.  I spent a lot of time researching these flags, and I know there will never be a complete and definitive list.  In addition, although I am a cisgender pansexual woman, I want to adopt an intersex child one day so that they will never have to face the surgical abuse you described.  I'm not planning on it because of some kind of exoticism; I realize that I am not an expert on intersexuality, but I do know a little more than the average person and would try to understand an intersex adopted child the best I can.

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:iconzkitster:
zkitster Featured By Owner Jun 23, 2014
Aaaaaah and a final point in reference to your original reference, it is there titled as an intersexual pride flag, not the intersex pride flag. Why did you change it´s name from the source you used, intersexual while in limited use is generally considered a word the denotes limted knowledge on intersex issues. Seeing as intersex is not a sexuality but a biological state of being.

And to clarify the intersex pride flag has been around for a longer time, it was however various variations of a yellow background with a purple circle. The one I was using before the standardised version came out formally in july 2013 was a larger but thinner purple circle, the yellow was a tone or two lighter and the purple a tone or so darker. Same flag has been around for longer but was standardised and offically accepted by OII (leading authority on intersex issues globally, the group ILGA work´s mostly with, two of your refrences that had nothing to do with the pride flag were from an OII affiliate) at the stated time.
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2014  Student Writer
I can see that you feel misrepresented.  I know it can be frustrating when you're dealing with a person who you feel is ignorant.  However, right now, I'm am exhausted.  It has nothing to do with you.  Yesterday I woke up 6 AM to go to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to do an assignment for a painting class, The NYC Pride Parade, ended up going to a church, went home, and fell asleep at 2 AM.

When I went to the Met, I had all my pride accessories on, including a rainbow lei, a pansexual bracelet, a necklace with a female symbol charm, and a rainbow flag (it's really hard to find pansexual flags unless you look online).  When I went into the museum, the security guards told me that I couldn't bring my rainbow flag into the museum.  I asked them to show me in writing anything that supported this rule.  They told me they didn't have to.  I was really afraid that they were going to take my flag and not give it back (we both know how security guards and police officers usually aren't very LGBT friendly).  I kept arguing until I compromised and told them I would give them the flag if a superior officer came, and I gave them the flag.  They gave it back, but I'm not sure they got angry and spit on it or something when I wasn't around.

Then I was walking all over Manhattan with my friend.  We took the subways a lot and probably walked at least 4 miles in the sun.  My friend is a Christian ally who used to go to LGBT meetings because he wanted to help bridge the queer community with open-minded churches and bring about a certain amount of understanding.  I sometimes go with him to Christian events even though I'm atheist so that I can try to give a face to Christians and maybe combat some of the ignorance.  We went to a church I had never of, but I was able to talk to the speaker and ask him some questions.  I asked him what he thought about gay rights, and when he talked me, it seemed like it he had good intentions but never really thought about it before.  He seemed friendly, and I'm hoping that maybe he will ponder more about and spread a good message to other Christians in lectures.

I know I just wrote a lot and claimed to be exhausted, but I just needed to tell someone about this.  This morning, I woke up and took a shower.  I was so tired that even with the water running, I fell asleep for a few seconds standing up.  I'm really having a stressful time in my life, and I'm really sorry if I have done anything wrong or misrepresented anything.  But I'm a really, really busy person.  I just recovered from getting sick from all the stress in my class.  I had lost six pounds in four days, and 3 of those pounds I lost in one day.  I can't debate or discuss with you all day.  Please know that I have very good intentions and would never want to show you any disrespect, but I would appreciate a lot it if you would be a little easier on me.  I'm still adding the flag lists, and it is hard to keep up with everything (not just because of time but also the amount effort it takes to research so many identities). I will try my best, but it will take a while before I can do everything.  I'm not perfect, and I would feel so much better if you could find it in your heart to forgive me if I offended you.  I can't write a post like this for a while, so if I take some time to fix the list, it is only because I'm am REALLY REALLY tired!  I need sleep and food and Sims and maybe a few nice words from family and friends.

Thanks for your patience and your vigilance,
- S.
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:iconzkitster:
zkitster Featured By Owner Jun 23, 2014
Oooh and even though it was formally introduced in early 2013 it has been around within intersex communities for a hell of  a lot longer. I remember slapping my intersex pride sticker on my laptop in late 2010, the moment I pulled it out of it´s box, then having to get a new one lat year when I updated.
And  I would like to reiterate that a source for your flag would be greatly apprecited. All I have ever been able to find about it is that it was created by a non intersex person and announced as an intersex, bi gender flag but never gained any real use in any intersex group outside a few rare instances in the USA which to my knowledge do not use them any more. Seeing as you did all this research you probably have ease of access to information I am not privvy to and probably have the exact source and author of the flag you posted, right?

None of your links actaully link to anything relating to the Pride flag, your first link is to icon and typography for use in pictoral language, then of course the intersexion trailer and then your last link leads to a statement on forced sterilisation

I am also very aware of the intersexion movie, seeing as I am hosting a formal screening with icelandic government (minister´s of health, welfare, education) and icelandic medic community in attendance during this summer´s pride week followed by a q/a session and reception for officials in attendance.
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2014  Student Writer
That may be true, but I am not heavily involved specifically with the intersex community.  I would love to be, but I don't know how.  I want to learn as much as I can, but it is very hard to know everything about each identity.  In addition, I live in the United States, so it wouldn't be unusual for me to only know that flag.  Although I have been to other countries, those countries were Canada, Burma, and Thailand.  Thailand has a lot of LGBTQI culture, but I was nine, so I may not have even know what "gay" met, much less intersex.

I'm not really sure the source of the flag because it's just EVERYWHERE.  Take a look at a Google search: www.google.com/search?q=inters…

Make sure you scroll down.  I always pick the ones that are most popular, and at the time, there probably was no trace of the now official version anywhere.  I apologize again, but please know that I spent days on this list, and it is not complete.  It will never be complete because that's impossible.
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:iconzkitster:
zkitster Featured By Owner Jun 23, 2014
Ummm great you want to adopt an intersex child one day, being an intersex person myself, having grown up in a family with more intersex people gives me a take on this matter which you do not have even though you have some strange wish to raise one of us.. I don´t assume you don´t know what you are talking about but being intersex, being a member of various intersex orginasations, as well as being the founder and chair of Intersex Iceland, having worked with several support groups and being part of various intersex discussion groups does mean I am steeped in intersex issues on a daily basis and have a very good working knowledge, which of course it would be impossible for you to have without devoting years to study and work on these issues. This working knowledge has lead to me being called upon by my government as an advisor to the comittee on LGBTQI issues. (Intersex might make it into equality law in Iceland in the next few years YAY :)

Great work on finding the origins of the flag I posted to you, how about finding similair origins for the one you posted originally, especially as the flag you posted has slowly had it´s intersex connotations removed and today you will have a harder time finding it anywhere other than blog post´s. To my understanding the flag you posted originated from a non intersex person. Also it places the bi-gender identity on intersex people who have other gender identities, for example I am intersex, intergender, feminine presenting, pansexual. I am not bi anything as that imply´s that I am both male and female in sex or gender identity when the truth is that I am between (inter).

I would reccomend keeping the Bigender flag up with a footnote about it having at one point served as an intersex flag. Nobody would take it seriously as such today :)  

Thing is I LOVE this list you made, I want to be able to spread it around but I don´t feel I can use an outdated list as an educational tool.

The flag I posted is also the flag that is agreed upon by all memebers of OII (Orginasation Intersex International) which is the leading group working for intersex right´s globally, a group highly supported by ILGA. A majority of attendants to the International Intersex Forum, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internat… come from OII affilates. The forum reaches consensus that are worked with on ILGA yearly conferences, so even though it is not a universally recognised symbol amongst all intersex people  it is actually recognised in a general sense amongst almost all groups I have had the joy of being in contact with, LGBTQI groups I know would pick the pride flag over the gendered striped one.
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2014  Student Writer
I don't claim to know more than you about intersexuality and intersex people.  I realize that I will never truly know what it's like to be intersex.  However, I really wish you would not treat me as if I am totally ignorant.  I may not be heavily involved in the intersex community, but if I knew a way to get more involved, I would do it.  I just don't know where to look or where to go.

Honestly, I have been looking at the origins of the offending flag.  I've found that many, many people use this flag, and because I'm not heavily involved in the intersex community myself, I really wouldn't have been able to know the difference since there are so many people using that flag.  There are different versions of the same flag, and it's hard to find out whether they are official.  Many of these flags are probably not official, and there are also many versions of the same ones.  In some cases, I had to choose the one I thought was most common because I can't post five different flags for the same identities.  I also think that's ironic that you did not realize that I myself am pansexual and female presenting.  It is not fair for you to know nothing of my identity yet accuse me of knowing nothing of yours.  We are queers.  We are LGBT.  We are women.  We shouldn't be fighting over a flag.  These flags are not there to drive us apart with specificity but to show pride for who were are.

But, with that all said, I am sorry that I used the wrong flag, and I updated it wherever I could. :hug:
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:iconazurefirestorm:
AzureFirestorm Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2014  Student Digital Artist
Just out of curiosity, may I ask where you found the furry flags, and whether you know of a generic furry flag instead of one specific to feline or canine?
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2014  Student Writer
I found the Furry flags here: www.gayfetishgoth.com/resource…

However, it doesn't include a general Furry flag.  I just did a Google search for one, but it seems there are a lot of different variations.  I'd suggest looking up the flags in Google images.  See if this link works or just type it in Google Images: www.google.com/search?q=furry+…

If you find a flag that you think has the most authority or just your favorite one, you can send me a note, and I will happily add it to this list.  Thanks!
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:iconbarondando:
Barondando Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Thank you! Was wondering about the Polysexual colors, your explanation makes sense :D
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2014  Student Writer
You're welcome! :)
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:iconrandomflyingpigeons:
randomflyingpigeons Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Thanks for crediting me as a source (I'm from FTM-Transscribed). It's greatly appreciated! :)
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2014  Student Writer
You're welcome!
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:iconflying-wolf-32:
flying-wolf-32 Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2014  Hobbyist
Hi There.

I really like the idea of this journal, and I found it very informative. I didn't even know that there was a specific flag for demisexuals. (I thought they shared the Asexual flag).

Although, what you said about the heterosexual flag is not quite true.

First off there are two heterosexual flags, and I feel that they both deserve to be mentioned. Old flag: flying-wolf-32.deviantart.com/… New Flag: flying-wolf-32.deviantart.com/…

The old heterosexual flag simply represents attraction to the opposite sex. The new one represents that as well, but it also represents YING and YANG. (which is why it is black and white; the design was inspiered by the chinise ying-yang symbol.)

This is a very controversial flag because unlike the Ally Pride flag, which represents straight people and others who specifically support the LGBT community, the heterosexual flag is not necessarily an ally flag.

No, it is not an ally flag, it is just a flag representing heterosexuality in general. The ally flag for heterosexuals was already mentioned. And if you will notice, it has the heterosexual flag in the background. It is true that the heterosexual flag is viewed controversial, but it is simply an image to represent heterosexuality and shouldn't be viewed as anything else.

Some heterosexual-identified people use the flag as a homophobic reaction to LGBT pride.  Others may use the flag as an indicator of their sexual orientation, but even that motivation is very questionable to the idea of equality in the face of privilege.

Okay, this part really annoyed me. How is having a flag to represent heterosexuality, "questionable in the idea of equality"??? If you want equality, you have include everyone. If 99% of the sexualities have an image to represent themselves with, why should heterosexuality be left out, simply because heterosexuals are the majority? Dose this sound like equality to you?

Okay, sorry if I came off as rude there, but if you could explain why it is wrong, I'm willing to listen.
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2014  Student Writer
Okay, I understand your concern, and I have no problem with answering your questions based on what I know.

I do know about the heterosexual flag that includes a heart in it.  The reason why I didn't include it is because I only include one flag per term.  Some of these terms have five or six proposed flags each, and I can't include them all.  You should see the amount of fetish flags out there.  They outnumber the rest of the LGBTQQIA flags greatly.

If you want, I will add the other heterosexual flag, but I have to say that it would be the only flag with two alternatives on the list.  I know that you mentioned equality, and listing two flags is not equal considering the other flags have only one, but if it is that important to you, I'll make an exception.  In addition, it is a flag that represents privilege.  I've seen people make the argument about similar representations of privilege.  People ask me why is there a Black History Month and an Asian History Month but no Caucasian History Month.  Every month is a Caucasian History month.  Every flag is a heterosexual flag.  I know so little about Asian history despite being Asian American because the town I grew up in is conservative and nobody knows anything about it, anyway.  Everyone knows about George Washington, Marie Antoinette, William Shakespeare, Princess Diana, Charles Darwin, etc. etc.  The list can go on forever.  However, can you tell me even one person who is Burmese other than Aung San Suu Kyi?  Can you tell me one prominent feminist who is Two-Spirit or intersex?  This is the reason to have flags in the first place.  Labels don't define us.  We define them, and they tell others of our stories.

I'm not sure if you read what I said correctly.  I said, "This is a very controversial flag because UNLIKE the Ally Pride flag, which represents straight people and others who specifically support the LGBT community, the heterosexual flag is NOT necessarily an ally flag."  That means it is not an ally flag.

Heterosexuals may not even be the majority.  It's not about numbers.  It's about how people are treated.  I was treated very differently when I thought I was heterosexual.  It's a whole different world when you're straight.  People talk about marriage and children and look at that pregnant lady, is it a girl or a boy?  I'm comfortable with being out as pansexual, but it is so awkward to tell people.  I think my neighbors hate me.  They egged my car, had their dogs poop on my lawn, and put a big scratch on my dad's windshield.  If that's equality between heterosexuals and LGBT people, well then, that equality sucks.  I'm actually just one of the lucky ones.  My trans friends get called fag every day, and recently a trans woman who a lot of my friends were close to was murdered.  They didn't even mention that she was trans in the newspapers.  If that's special treatment, then I guess "special" means "inferior."

The thing about privilege is that those with privilege are always the first to complain.  This is the metaphor I tend to use:  Imagine there are two kids.  Kid #1 has an XBOX 360.  Kid #2 doesn't have an XBOX 360 but really wants one.  One day, Kid #1 gets into trouble just like any other kid, and his or her parent takes away the XBOX for a week.  Kid #1 gets very angry and demands to have the XBOX because he or she believe she deserves it.  He or she screams and yells at his or her parent for three days before they finally give in and give the XBOX back.  Kid #2 continues to not have the XBOX, so Kid #2 doesn't even notice a week going by without it and never demands to have it back.  And if Kid #2 did demand to have an XBOX out of the blue, his or her parents would just think the child was being spoiled whereas Kid #1's parents feel guilty that they didn't give it back to Kid #1.

I hope that makes sense.
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:iconlovemystarfire:
lovemystarfire Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
OK, so the whole  "Special treatment" or maybe the upset about the hetero flag thing.  This is an LGBT Glossary of terms by definition Heterosexual is not a part of this group..  unless you are talking about allies  and .. well she covered that. The fact that she even included the hetero flag is something I never would have considered. When I can Legally marry my wife in any sate I guess I might consider adding a hetero flag to my stuff but honestly our community is not here to support heterosexuals. We are here to support all the people that heterosexuals have humiliated, demeaned, and condemned. When your family and friends disown you for being hetero let me know and I will make a flag just for you...  Until that happens shut up and take your privileged ass somewhere it can do some good.
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2014  Student Writer
Thank you so much for defending me.  I really try to be fair, but it's not nice when other people demand things that are unreasonable and mean.  :hug:  You are such a wonderful friend!  You always have my back, and I want to always have your back, too! :D

I notice that it's always the privileged people who get angry when even the tiniest bit of power is taken away from them.  The reason why is because they've never had to deal with it before, so they freak out.  Someone who is disadvantaged can't miss what they've never had, and that includes being treated with respect.
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:iconlovemystarfire:
lovemystarfire Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
No problem. I hate to sound like an angry lesbian but the depths of peoples ignorance and narcissism makes my blood boil. I usually just block ignorant people and move on. I don't know why people think I'm out to convert people.. I'm Wiccan I don't convert. I simply want to make a place for like minded/curious people to learn and express themselves without worrying about bigots and ignorance. The only thing that makes me madder than a straight person whining about privileged is members of the LGBT community being unsupportable of other facets of our community. I see people put down polyamory all the time... WTF how can someone who has been discriminated against their whole lives turn around and become bigoted towards a group of their own community. Guess what telling someone they can only sleep with one person after marriage is like telling someone they can only sleep with a person of the opposite sex...
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2014  Student Writer
You're not an angry lesbian.  You're a sensible person who happens to lesbian.

As an atheist, people try to convert me all the time.  When I was a Buddhist, everybody just thought it was cool, but now that my label has changed despite the fact that my beliefs have changed very little, people think that I'm an open target.  People know that it's wrong to try to convert someone else who has their own faith because that's discrimination, but they assume that because atheists have no religion and there is no prejudice or violation of human rights.

I've dated Wiccans before, and I used to be in the Pagan club at Rutgers (until they got weird with the meeting dates and times).  Wicca is very interesting religion, and I like learning more about it.

Yeah, I've seen LGBT people who don't understand other identities.  I just finished replying to a post that was made by an aromantic asexual cisgender man.  He told me that there are only two genders and that they're based on genitalia, calling anyone else a "hermaphrodite."  He said that nonbinary labels are like calling yourself an "emo" or a "goth."  He also said that women are bitchy and bossy.  He wasn't trying to say it in a harsh way, but that pretty much sums up his argument.  I tried to remind him that there are lots of people who don't believe that his identity exists, either.  So I'll wait and see what he says about that.

When I identified as bisexual, I did see that some of my gay and lesbian friends acted like they didn't mind but were hesitant to say their own opinion because it was somewhat obvious that they either had a bad experience with bisexuals or just did not want to date them.
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:iconlovemystarfire:
lovemystarfire Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
OMG thank you for the points!!

I am wicca but I am more Pagan than anything. There was a time when Wicca (and some groups that still follow Gerald Gardner) are anti LGBT. However, Gerald Gardner has been largley discredited over the last few years. I am not a Gardner Wicca. I have no familily lineage to Wicca and all of my family are Christians. I tend to follow Scott Cunningham and Silver Ravenwolf. In fact Silver Ravenwolf's rune cards are my main divination tool.

I'm getting ready to write a rant journal about Divisions within out community. You might politely remind that guy that it is no more his business to define my sexuality than it is for me to define his. Everyone has a right to wear the label they like best and it is really none of his business. I had a bisexual male tell me Pansexuality wasn't real, and I had a lesbian tell me that a Transgender Christian was an oxymoron. The divisions are just stupid. As far as I am concerned as long as it is between consenting adults then its none of my business.

I am sure that there is a huge divide between Gays and Bisexuals..  I think this happens when a gay person gets left for a member of the opposite sex.  It tends to hurt our pride and gives us an "excuse" to blame the leaving partner instead of admitting that there was another issue with the relationship. I also know many lesbians that enjoy chasing a straight girl and then getting mad when she isn't interested ..  or tries it and doesn't like it.   It is a double standard and hopefully our community can grow up some and become more accepting of people JUST LIKE US.
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:iconsavvyred:
SavvyRed Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2014  Student Writer
Yeah, I think I heard of him from what people said in the Pagan club.  There was one girl who was very knowledgeable about these things, and I think she said that some people believe that true Wicca is only from the Gardner tradition.  I don't know if I got confused with someone else, but I know someone had a following that certain individuals believed is the only true Wicca tradition.  I think that doesn't make much sense, but I'm not Wiccan or Pagan.

He replied to my posts, and we agreed not to talk about it.

Once I met a lesbian who freaked out when I explained to her what pansexuality was and what intersex meant.  She actually had been to pride parades and was married.  But I guess she had no idea what these things meant because she probably lived in my conservative town.

I hope people can be accepting, too.  Knowing about intersectionality is important, yet most people don't know about it.  Not even LGBT people.
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:iconsugarman94:
SugarMan94 Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2014
The checkerboard flag, since it is taken from a musical genre that broke the barrier between blacks and whites, it could also mean breaking the barrier between gay and straight people, it could be a "Straight but not Narrow" flag to be more precise.
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